Archive for guerrilla marketing

Use Your Resources

Posted in Experiential Marketing, General Marketing, Promotional Events, Social Media Marketing with tags , , , , on August 18, 2011 by caitlineoconnor

The key to successful guerrilla and event marketing these days is no longer just executing a successful event, reaching a large amount of people at the event or promotion and influencing them with your brand. These days, it’s much more than that. Social media marketing and mobile are growing so fast there are so many avenues you must hit and can use to your advantage. Facebook and Twitter are the key players but there are so many more growing niche avenues that can be used with the growth of apps.

I recently worked a guerrilla marketing stunt for the promotion of the movie 30 Minutes or Less. We drove around in a food truck giving away free pizza, free pre-screening movie passes, t-shirts, hats and posters outside of nightlife spots. On top of this, we tweeted our location with the hashtag #30morl so others could follow and encouraged people to check in on Foursquare to unlock the 30 Minutes or Less badge. While Twitter was a huge part of the campaign, other apps  and websites had to be utilized as well such as Meetup.com and SF Fun and Cheap. With the growth of smartphones, these can be used and updated on the fly. It’s exciting how many resources are out there today for reaching the right demographic and finding the right hot spots. Success no longer just depends on  influencing those at the event, it now depends on utilizing all of your resources to find the right spots, reaching more people who would otherwise not join in, and making the conversation last.

“Fairly Legal” Promotion in San Francisco

Posted in Experiential Marketing, Promotional Events with tags , , , , , , , , on January 27, 2011 by caitlineoconnor

After finally having made my move to the West Coast, I worked the perfect promotion for someone new to the city of San Francisco. Last week, a street team of about 20 gathered to promote USA Network’s new TV show “Fairly Legal”. We hit all the busy spots in the city and even made our way to Berkeley and, let’s just say we made a lot of noise.

Fairly Legal is series about Kate Reed (Sarah Shahi) being a firm believer that justice can always be found, even if it’s not always in the courtroom.”Once a lawyer at her family’s esteemed San Francisco firm, Kate’s frustration with the legal system led her to a new career as a mediator”.

The promotion consisted of a street team, all dressed in the same attire to emulate Kate, mocking a protest and yelling the show’s taglines such as: “Get Kate, Mediate!” “Don’t Hate, Litigate”(on Haight Street) and “No Mitigation, Only Mediation”. Also, we handed out gray and white cookies because “justice is never black and white”.

While this promotion was being run in other cities, I assume that it received the most attention in San Francisco and Berkeley due to the fact that it was a mock protest. Many people in areas that are famous for protesting voiced their frustration with the promotion saying that they felt it was “out of line”.  Well, being a publicity stunt, negative attention is still attention and therefore the promotion was effective. There were, of course,  people who enjoyed the event as well, finding it entertaining.

Campbell’s Soup Promotion- Brand Repositioning

Posted in Experiential Marketing, Promotional Events with tags , , , , , , on October 25, 2010 by caitlineoconnor

A little while ago I worked on an experiential event for Campbell’s Soup. Rather than marketing the soup itself, Campbell’s repositioned them self by marketing the fact that you could cook with Campbell’s Condensed Soup. The event was quite different from most sampling events because the event staff made roast beef sandwiches out of a mobile branded truck with a full kitchen inside. The event was half guerrilla, and half of the spots were planned. We passed out samples of the sandwiches along with recipes to people on the streets of Boston.

Brand repositioning is an extremely challenging tasks. Changing a consumers view on a brand is harder than getting the brand in their head in the first place.  Using an experiential event to reposition a brand is a good idea because it gives consumers direct contact with the “reposition”.  Also, Campbell’s went about it the right way by broadening their reach rather than trying to change the view of existing consumers. By repositioning, Campbell’s also differentiated them self from competitors.